The Front Line

  • Form follows Function: Changing Audiences Bring Changes to InterpretationsRead More

    Category: Analysis Posted: 5/31/2012 Author: Craig Swain | 

    Visiting the battlefields today, the markers placed fifty even ten years ago look different than the "new" markers today. Why? because we tour the battlefields differently. So what does that say about how we use those resources? What drove the change?

  • Nathan Bedford Forrest, ReconstructedRead More

    Category: Commentary Posted: 5/27/2012 Author: Andy Hall | 

    Nathan Bedford Forrest is mythologized today as the consummate "unreconstructed rebel," but by the end of his life he fully and publicly embraced North-South reconciliation, and allegiance to the reunited nation.

  • Neutrality or Death?Read More

    Category: Friday Funny Posted: 5/25/2012 Author: Laura June Davis | 

    Good Morning! Today's Friday Funny comes to us from the June 29, 1861 edition of Harper's Weekly. The caption reads, "Governor Magoffin's neutrality means holding the Cock of the Walk (Uncle Sam) while the Confederate Cat (Jeff Davis) kills off his Chickens."

  • LorenaRead More

    Category: From the Archives Posted: 5/21/2012 Author: Laura June Davis | 

    One of the most popular Civil War songs was Lorena. Reverend Henry D. L. Webster first penned the lyrics in 1856 after his fianc?? Ella Blocksom?ended their engagement. However, in his version, the protagonist was named Bertha. A few years later, J.P. Webster?who was not related to Henry Webster?sought words to a musical piece he was composing.

  • Why Don't You Take It?Read More

    Category: Friday Funny Posted: 5/18/2012 Author: Laura June Davis | 

    Good morning! Today's Friday Funny is an 1861 Currier & Ives sketch commenting on the Union's substantial advantage in terms war materiel.

  • John Mackie: The Man and the MemoryRead More

    Category: Iron Men Afloat Posted: 5/15/2012 Author: Laura June Davis | 

    One rarely thinks of the United States Marine Corps and the Civil War in the same thought. Given their small size and limited service, this is not surprising. And yet hidden away in a rarely visited section of the Richmond National Battlefield Park?Drewry?s Bluff?sits an interpretative marker honoring Corporal John F. Mackie

  • The Battle of Drury's BluffRead More

    Category: Iron Men Afloat Posted: 5/15/2012 Author: Dave Kummer | 

    The Monitor remained close to the Galena but the Confederates chose to concentrate their fire on a more vulnerable target after several direct hits merely caromed off the Monitor's heavy armor. That left the Galena alone to take the full brunt of the Rebel onslaught; their salvo ripped through her armored sides. On board the Galena, Corporal John F. Mackie commanded the ship’s 12-man Marine...

  • Vigil Strange I Kept on the Field One NightRead More

    Category: From the Archives Posted: 5/14/2012 Author: Laura June Davis | 

    The following Walt Whitman poem??Vigil Strange I Kept on the Field One Night??reminds us of the tangible, human costs of war. Whitman often found the wholesale anonymity of the war dead disturbing; therefore poems like "Virgil" were his way to ensure that the battlefield dead found individual recognition.

  • The "Light Guard"Read More

    Category: Friday Funny Posted: 5/11/2012 Author: Laura June Davis | 

    Today's Friday Funny is an 1861 Harper's Weekly cartoon. Entitled ?Costume Suggested for the Brave Stay-at-Home Light Guard," this sketch mockingly questions the masculinity of Union men who did not voluntarily enlist into military service.

  • ...And They're Off..Read More

    Category: From the Archives Posted: 5/5/2012 Author: Laura June Davis | 

    In honor of the Kentucky Derby, we bring you this image of Civil War era horse racing courtesy of Frank Leslie.

The Bookshelf

Midnight in America (2017)

Author: Jonathan W. White

Reviewed by: Lesley J. Gordon

Lincoln Before Lincoln (2016)

Author: Brian Snee

Reviewed by: Allen C. Guelzo

My Gettysburg (2016)

Author: Mark A. Snell

Reviewed by: Jeffry D. Wert

About This Blog

The Front Line is our communal blog featuring the latest in Civil War news, research, analysis, and events from a network of scholars.

For information concerning the blog, inquiries into becoming a blogger for The Front Line, events calendar requests, or general questions, please contact the Contributing Editor: 


Robert Poister
robby@civilwarmonitor.com



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The Bookshelf

Midnight in America (2017)

Author: Jonathan W. White

Reviewed by: Lesley J. Gordon

Lincoln Before Lincoln (2016)

Author: Brian Snee

Reviewed by: Allen C. Guelzo

My Gettysburg (2016)

Author: Mark A. Snell

Reviewed by: Jeffry D. Wert

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