The Front Line

  • Wither Liberia? Civil War Emancipation and Freedmen Resettlement in West AfricaRead More

    Category: Commentary Posted: 11/11/2012 Author: Phillip W. Magness | 

    In October 1862, Robert J. Walker went to the Treasury Department to convince the Lincoln Administration of the righteousness of colonizing Liberia with the slaves who would soon be freed by the Emancipation Proclamation.

  • The Peace Monument At Appomattox, UDC, and ReconstructionRead More

    Category: Commentary Posted: 10/29/2012 Author: Caroline Janney | 

    In May 1932, Mary Davidson Carter, a member of the United Daughters of the Confederacy (UDC) from Upperville, Virginia, learned that the federal government was planning to erect a Peace Monument at the scene of General Robert E. Lee's surrender to General Ulysses S. Grant; or, as she put it, "the place where Constitutional Government and Lee were crucified in 1865."

  • The Myth of the H.L. Hunley's Blue LanternRead More

    Category: Analysis Posted: 10/8/2012 Author: Christopher D. Rucker, MD | 

    It has long been said that, after sinking the USS Housatonic on the evening of February 17, 1864, the crew of the Confederate submarine Hunley used a "blue light" to signal their success to shore. In truth, the blue lantern is a modern myth, born of ignorance of a lost technology.

  • The Consequences of Damning the TorpedoesRead More

    Category: Analysis Posted: 10/1/2012 Author: John Grady | 

    When Lieutenant Commander William H. Gamble reported that he had moved out of the way of an ironclad and was about to drop anchor, "a torpedo exploded under the bow, and the vessel immediately commenced sinking." He reported two sailors were killed in the explosion, was unsure about how many were wounded below deck but confirmed three sailors were wounded on deck. "The wounded were conveyed to the...

  • The Battle For Freedom: Antietam and the Emancipation ProclamationRead More

    Category: Commentary Posted: 9/17/2012 Author: Louis P. Masur | 

    Abraham Lincoln spent the late summer of 1862 waiting. He had in his mind a plan to issue a proclamation of emancipation, and needed only a Union victory in battle to do so.

  • Bowdoin's Other Civil War SonsRead More

    Category: Analysis Posted: 8/27/2012 Author: David Thomson | 

    Discussions surrounding Bowdoin College and the Civil War invariably return to Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain and the 20th Maine. But another brotherly duo at Bowdoin is even more important to our understanding of the War: Oliver Otis and Charles Howard.

  • Fathering RecruitmentRead More

    Category: Friday Funny Posted: 8/24/2012 Author: Laura June Davis | 

    Titled, "A Good Way for Fathers of Families to Aid Recruiting," this July 1862 Harper's Weekly cartoon is a playful take on Union recruitment efforts.

  • Hercules of the UnionRead More

    Category: Friday Funny Posted: 8/17/2012 Author: Laura June Davis | 

    Today's Friday Funny is a celebration of Union General Winfield Scott, cast here as the mythical Hercules slaying a secessionist hydra. Aiding Scott in his epic battle is the great club of "Liberty and Union." Each of the hydra's seven heads represent a prominent Southern leader and their major vice or crime.

  • John Sherman and the Would-Be Thirteenth Amendment of 1861Read More

    Category: Analysis Posted: 8/6/2012 Author: Dan Crofts | 

    Four years before Congress passed the Thirteenth Amendment abolishing slavery, Republican John Sherman of Ohio argued the merits of a very different Thirteenth Amendment, one that would do the exact opposite.

  • Munson Monroe Buford's Unfinished Civil WarRead More

    Category: Analysis Posted: 7/30/2012 Author: James Broomall | 

    Munson Monroe Buford's Civil War did not end at Durham Station, North Carolina, in the spring of 1865 but instead continued, in varied forms, for the remainder of his life.

The Bookshelf

Midnight in America (2017)

Author: Jonathan W. White

Reviewed by: Lesley J. Gordon

Lincoln Before Lincoln (2016)

Author: Brian Snee

Reviewed by: Allen C. Guelzo

My Gettysburg (2016)

Author: Mark A. Snell

Reviewed by: Jeffry D. Wert

About This Blog

The Front Line is our communal blog featuring the latest in Civil War news, research, analysis, and events from a network of scholars.

For information concerning the blog, inquiries into becoming a blogger for The Front Line, events calendar requests, or general questions, please contact the Contributing Editor: 


Robert Poister
robby@civilwarmonitor.com



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The Bookshelf

Midnight in America (2017)

Author: Jonathan W. White

Reviewed by: Lesley J. Gordon

Lincoln Before Lincoln (2016)

Author: Brian Snee

Reviewed by: Allen C. Guelzo

My Gettysburg (2016)

Author: Mark A. Snell

Reviewed by: Jeffry D. Wert

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