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Published 11/8/2011

A Regiment of Inventors

By: Civil War Monitor Category: Analysis

Ingenuity was wielded as a weapon during the American Civil War, with inventors plying their trade in the “arts of death,” as Shaw put it. One newspaper, noting that the “inventive faculty of the country is in the Northern States,” put out a colorful call:

Published 11/7/2011

Voices from the Past: "Sagacious Military Conjecture"

By: Laura June Davis Category: From the Archives

Wilder Dwight was a Lieutenant Colonel inthe 2nd Regiment Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry. Prior to dying September 19, 1862 from wounds at the Battle of Antietam, Dwight wrote some conjectures about the events at the Battle of Port Royal.

Published 11/7/2011

The Confederate Perspective: "Port Royal...has been taken by the enemy's fleet"

By: Laura June Davis Category: Quotables

— From the 9 November 1861 entry of John Beauchamp Jones Diary—

Published 11/7/2011

Voices from the Past: "The Glorious News from Port Royal"

By: Laura June Davis Category: From the Archives

After the Union victory at Port Royal, Major General George Brinton McClellan wrote the following letter to his wife, Mary Ellen Marcy McClellan.

Published 11/7/2011

Voices from the Past: "A Slow Affair"

By: Laura June Davis Category: From the Archives

William Thompson Lusk (May 23, 1838 – June 12, 1897) was an American obstetrician, who left medical school to join the Union Army. Lusk participated in the Battle of Port Royal and wrote about his experiences. Unusually, Lusk did not vilify the Southern soldiers he encountered; he seemed to regard the Southerners highly, often criticizing the "Yankee hordes" who invaded the Southerners' ...

Published 11/7/2011

Voices from the Past: "The Gratifying Duty"

By: Laura June Davis Category: From the Archives

Today marks the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Port Royal—one of the earliest amphibious operations of the American Civil War. The United States Navy fleet and the United States Army expeditionary force worked together captured Port Royal Sound, South Carolina, including Fort Walker on Hilton Head Island and Fort Beauregard on Phillip's Island. The following is Union Flag Officer Samuel Du ...

Published 11/4/2011

Image of the Day: The Dogs of War

By: Terry Johnston Category: From the Archives

From Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper, "An Incident of Battle — A Faithful Dog Watching the Dead Body of His Master" ...

Published 11/3/2011

Sarah Morgan's Arrival in Yankee-Occupied New Orleans

By: Terry Johnston Category: From the Archives

In April 1863, 21-year-old Sarah Morgan, along with her mother and sisters, found herself on a ship headed for the city of her birth, New Orleans. The Morgan familiy had lived in Baton Rouge for years, but after Union forces took the town the previous August, they abondoned their home...

Published 11/2/2011

MARTIN: General Braxton Bragg, C.S.A. (2011)

By: Jeffry D Wert Category: Book Reviews

In this lengthy and well-researched new biography of Bragg, Samuel Martin attempts to rectify the Confederate general’s historical record and reputation. It is a commendable effort by the veteran author that will assuredly stir further debate and controversy...

Published 10/31/2011

Voices from the Past - Out of That Silence Rose New Sounds More Appalling Still

By: Laura June Davis Category: Quotables

The Battle of Fredericksburg (December 11-15, 1862) was a decisive loss for the Union Army, crippling Northern morale. The chilling quote below derives from Lieutenant Colonel Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain's description of the battle's aftermath