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  • SHERBURNE: The St. Albans Raid (2014)Read More

    Category: Book Reviews Posted: 2/25/2015 Author: Jonathan A. Noyalas | 

    Despite the fact that the St. Albans Raid was the northernmost attack by Confederates during the conflict and threatened relations between the United States, Canada, and Great Britain in the midst of our republic's most trying period, it has been largely ignored by historians.

  • PRIEST: "Stand to It and Give Them Hell" (2014)Read More

    Category: Book Reviews Posted: 2/25/2015 Author: Benjamin Neely | 

    The soldiers' stories are pulled together so that the reader can get a sense of what the common soldier saw and felt in a specific time and place, hour-by-hour, on the battlefield over the course of July 2, 1863.

  • Am Interview with Richard FoxRead More

    Category: Behind the Lines Posted: 2/20/2015 Author: David K. Thomson | 

    Our conversation with Richard Fox, Professor of history at the University of Southern California and recent author of "Lincoln's Body: A Cultural History," now out with W.W. Norton. In this interview, Dr. Fox discusses the political power of Lincoln's body during his presidency, the significance of Lincoln's funeral train, and the power of the "enshrined body" and the "national body" in the 150...

  • DOHREN (ed.): Letters from a Shoebox (2013)Read More

    Category: Book Reviews Posted: 2/18/2015 Author: Zachery A. Fry | 

    In a field where authors thrive on emphasizing novelty in their subject matter, these letters are valuable precisely because the men and women who wrote them were so ordinary.

  • An Interview with Martha HodesRead More

    Category: Behind the Lines Posted: 2/13/2015 Author: David K. Thomson | 

    Our conversation with Martha Hodes, a Professor of history at New York University, and recent author of "Mourning Lincoln," now out with Yale University Press. In this interview, Dr. Hodes details the inspiration behind tackling this topic of personal responses to Lincoln's assassination. In addition, she also addresses the vast amount of sources present on the topic and the struggles and benefits...

  • KING: To Raise Up a Nation (2013)Read More

    Category: Book Reviews Posted: 2/11/2015 Author: William D. Hickox | 

    This work is an intriguing read and an often-persuasive argument for the primacy of black men's deeds over white men's legislation.

  • ESCOTT: Lincoln's Dilemma (2014)Read More

    Category: Book Reviews Posted: 2/11/2015 Author: Martin J. Hardeman | 

    Abraham Lincoln and the Civil War destroyed slavery in the United States, but racial prejudice was only a little discomforted.

  • SPENCER (ed.): A Connecticut Yankee in Lincoln's Cabinet (2014)Read More

    Category: Book Reviews Posted: 2/4/2015 Author: Peter C. Vermilyea | 

    J. Ronald Spencer provides a manageable way to glean the best from Gideon Welles's famous diary, and allows for a better understanding of how Lincoln and his administration dealt with the vital issues of the period.

  • COOLING: Jubal Early (2014)Read More

    Category: Book Reviews Posted: 1/28/2015 Author: Scott L. Mingus, Sr.  | 

    Benjamin Cooling's new book is a worthwhile read for anyone seeking an overview of the famed Confederate general and postwar apologist. Entertaining, well written, and fast-paced, it will leave inquisitive readers wanting to explore the many primary and secondary sources the author presents in his extensive bibliography.

  • An Interview with Peter Carmichael (2015)Read More

    Category: Behind the Lines Posted: 1/23/2015 Author: David K. Thomson | 

    Our conversation with Peter Carmichael, the Director of the Civil War Institute at Gettysburg College. In this interview, Dr. Carmichael touches on some of the events and speakers at this year's 2015 Civil War Institute in June. In addition, he also addresses some of the recent controversy over the state of Civil War military history. To read more on the Gettysburg Compiler, visit http:/...

About This Blog

Our main blog feed, The CWM Collective contains posts, published as they go live, from our three blogs: The Front Line; The Bookshelf; and Behind the Lines.


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