The CWM Collective

  • MOORE & MOORE: Collaborators for Emancipation (2014)Read More

    Category: Book Reviews Posted: 12/17/2014 Author: Louis P. Masur | 

    The Moores argue that during the war Lincoln became more radical, and that he and Lovejoy were "collaborators for emancipation."

  • An Interview with Anne Sarah Rubin (2014)Read More

    Category: Behind the Lines Posted: 12/12/2014 Author: David K. Thomson | 

    Our conversation with Anne Sarah Rubin, an Associate Professor of history at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County and recent author of "Through the Heart of Dixie: Sherman's March and American Memory," published by UNC Press. In this interview, Dr. Rubin offers some insight into how her work deviates from prior studies of Sherman's March through the power of storytelling. Additionally, Dr....

  • GLEESON & LEWIS (eds.): The Civil War as Global Conflict (2014)Read More

    Category: Book Reviews Posted: 12/10/2014 Author: Nimrod Tal | 

    Without conceding its high academic standards, the book remains accessible to a wider educated audience, and the richness of subjects discussed in the essays...provides an array of access points into the field. With the bulk of existing scholarship directed primarily to and consumed largely by professionals, this is a noteworthy and timely achievement.

  • An Interview with Lesley GordonRead More

    Category: Behind the Lines Posted: 12/5/2014 Author: David K. Thomson | 

    Our conversation with Lesley Gordon, Professor of History at the University of Akron and author of "A Broken Regiment: The 16th Connecticut's Civil War," published by LSU Press. In this interview, Dr. Gordon reveals where her interest in the 16th Connecticut stems from, her hopes for new regimental histories, and a brief overview of the 16th's performance during the course of the war itself...

  • LEIGH: Trading with the Enemy (2014)Read More

    Category: Book Reviews Posted: 12/3/2014 Author: Brian K. Fennessy | 

    This study should encourage wider scholarly attention to wartime economic behavior that supplemented, contradicted, or rejected ideological motivations. It will also disabuse many readers of romantic misconceptions about the capacity of either side for selfless virtue.

  • MALANOWSKI: Commander Will Cushing (2014)Read More

    Category: Book Reviews Posted: 12/3/2014 Author: Craig L. Symonds | 

    Cushing was no accidental hero. Young, brash, touchy, fearless, and vain, he eagerly sought heroism; the Civil War provided him with ample opportunities.

  • DONOHOE (ed.): The Printer's Kiss (2014)Read More

    Category: Book Reviews Posted: 11/26/2014 Author: George C. Rable  | 

    As a tale of family turmoil in the middle of the nineteenth century, this book succeeds admirably. Readers will not develop any particular affection for the Tomlinsons, but their letters (along with Donohoe's indispensable narrative sections that explicate their story within the wider context of the Civil War) presents a quite good and often complicated history.

  • LONGENECKER: Gettysburg Religion (2014)Read More

    Category: Book Reviews Posted: 11/26/2014 Author: John M. Rudy | 

    Religion is a human endeavor. A church is not a building or an organization, but a collection of people who care about each other, pray with each other, bicker with each other, and love each other. And this is the promise of studying religion in the nineteenth century, particularly in a town like Gettysburg.

  • GRANT: The Louisville, Cincinnati & Charleston Rail Road (2014)Read More

    Category: Book Reviews Posted: 11/26/2014 Author: Roger Pickenpaugh | 

    Could a lengthy ribbon of steel have overcome the divisiveness of Kansas-Nebraska, Dred Scott, John Brown, and the election of 1860?

  • An Interview with Stephen CushmanRead More

    Category: Behind the Lines Posted: 11/21/2014 Author: David K. Thomson | 

    Our conversation with Stephen Cushman, the Robert C. Taylor Professor of English at the University of Virginia and recent author of "Belligerent Muse: Five Northern Writers and How They Shaped Our Understanding of the Civil War," published by UNC Press. In this interview Dr. Cushman discusses the five writers (Abraham Lincoln, Walt Whitman, William T. Sherman, Ambrose Bierce, and Joshua ...

About This Blog

Our main blog feed, The CWM Collective contains posts, published as they go live, from our three blogs: The Front Line; The Bookshelf; and Behind the Lines.


Archive

Blog Roll

Twitter





Facebook